7ELA- Cattes-2nd Hr. Assignments

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Due:

Daily English 5-4-3-2-1  1/4-1/15 in Google Classroom

Daily English 5-4-3-2-1 1/4-1/15

Complete the daily ELA Skills Practice. 1 per day over the week.
5- Mon.
4- Tues.
3- Wed.
2- Thurs.
1- Fri.
Repeat for following week. Review for completion and quality. Submit when completed.

Due:

Playlist of Me- Argumentative Writing  in Google Classroom

Playlist of Me- Argumentative Writing

Follow directions on attached link.

Reminder-
Capitalize Title of Songs
Put Lyrics used in " " Qutation Marks
Use 2 complete sentences to argue your reason why that song represents that section of your life.

Past Assignments

Due:

I XL- K.6 Identidy a counterclaim
 in Google Classroom

I XL- K.6 Identidy a counterclaim

Key Idea- When you're writing an argument, you want to consider how someone might argue against your claim. Arguments against your claim are called counterclaims, or counterarguments. Addressing counterclaims makes you appear more fair and balanced as a writer, and it can help you build a stronger argument.

Due:

I XL- K.3 Choose evidence to support a claim
 in Google Classroom

I XL- K.3 Choose evidence to support a claim

A claim is a statement of a writer's argument, position, or opinion. When you make a claim in a piece of writing, you should also give evidence, or details, to support that claim. Strong evidence should show why your claim is valid or true.
Ex.
Claim: Reinhold Messner is the greatest mountaineer of all time.
Evidence: Reinhold Messner was the first person to successfully climb all fourteen of the world's eight-thousand-meter peaks.

Evidence does not provide strong support if it contradicts or opposes your claim:
Ex. Reinhold Messner does not hold the record for the most successful summits of Mount Everest, which currently stands at twenty-one.

Evidence does not provide strong support if it is off-topic or doesn't address why your claim is true:
Ex. Reinhold Messner was born in northern Italy and spent much of the early part of his life climbing the peaks of the Alps.

Due:

Argument Writing Practice in Google Classroom

Argument Writing Practice

Imagine you and your friends have been stranded on a deserted island for
days and have finally been rescued! Everyone wants to be taken directly to a
fast food restaurant to eat! In order for that to happen, you must all agree on
which restaurant it should be.

Fill in the areas provided to make a strong case for the restaurant you believe
would be the best for everyone. You will need 3 Claims/reasons for your choice and 1 counterclaim/your friend's opposing idea against your choice.

Due:

Dectective Lesson-Notes, Reading & Writing to solve a crime  in Google Classroom

Dectective Lesson-Notes, Reading & Writing to solve a crime

1. Notes- In your Digital Notebooks - Skill Notes- Add the terms & definitions for ARGUMENT, CLAIM, PREMISE, EVIDENCE
2. READ TEXT- A crime has possibly been committed, and you’ve been hired to take on the role of detective to
help figure out what has happened. Using the information from The Bountiful Case report below and
the photographic evidence.
3. WRITE- Complete the Case Report on slide 2 and slide 3.

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NoRedInk! Dear 2020/21 in Google Classroom

NoRedInk! Dear 2020/21

Work on “Dear 2020/21, .”

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NoRedInk! It all started when/free write in Google Classroom

NoRedInk! It all started when/free write

Work on “It all started when/free write.”

Class Join Code: better mouse 50

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Daily English 5-4-3-2-1  11/30-12/18 in Google Classroom

Daily English 5-4-3-2-1 11/30-12/18

Complete the daily ELA Skills Practice. 1 per over the week.
5- Mon.
4- Tues.
3- Wed.
2- Thurs.
1- Fri.
Repeat for following 2 weeks. Submit when completed

Due:

NoRedInk! Cook Family Christmas Letter in Google Classroom

NoRedInk! Cook Family Christmas Letter

Work on “Cook Family Christmas Letter- Fever 1793.”

Due:

A Christmas Carol- Read & Respond in Google Classroom

A Christmas Carol- Read & Respond

Read the following play version of Charles Dicken’s A Christmas Carol
https://action.scholastic.com/issues/2017-18/120117/a-christmas-carol.html

Making an Inference
You’ve just read “A Christmas Carol.” Now it’s time to try this activity.
Tip: An inference is something that isn’t stated but can be figured out from clues in the text.

What to do: Imagine that you are Ebenezer Scrooge. Your nephew Fred has some questions about your experiences on Christmas Eve 1843. Make inferences to answer each of the 5 questions attached with at least one complete sentence. Show your typed responses in red/green colored font.

Due:

Plot Map- Fever 1793 in Google Classroom

Plot Map- Fever 1793

Use the paper copy of the attached document - or make a digital copy of the example one shared below if you are working from home.

Fill in with complete sentences and specific details from your reading.
Bring to class/submit Friday- use as study guide for book quiz on Friday!

Due:

Vocabulary Fever 1793- Words of the Day in Google Classroom

Vocabulary Fever 1793- Words of the Day

Use the Quizlet flashcards to brush up on the definitions of the 15 words of the day. You should know what they mean and be able to use the word in a sentence correctly.

Vocabulary Quiz -Thursday

Due:

IXL-  H. Comparing Texts 1-2 in Google Classroom

IXL- H. Comparing Texts 1-2

H.1 Compare information from two texts
H.2 Compare two texts with different genres
After taking the notes below. Complete the practice on IXL. Smart Score of at least 90 is the goal. Screenshot your score and attach it to this assignment when you are done.

Notes:
-Compare information from two texts
When you study a topic, it's a good idea to read texts from different authors. Think about how the texts are similar and how they are different. The details included in the texts can help you understand the authors' points of view.

-Compare two texts with different genres
Authors sometimes revisit or reinterpret the same topics, themes, and stories as other authors.
The way that authors present ideas often depends on the genre, or text type, they use. Some genres may help to inform, explain, or persuade readers. Other genres may help to entertain readers or show a more personal perspective. Reading texts with different genres can help readers understand different perspectives or gain a more in-depth understanding of a topic.
When you compare texts about the same topic, think about how authors in different genres build on, challenge, or reveal new viewpoints about that topic.

Due:

Places, Terms & Characters to Know- Fever 1793 Study Guide- Side 2 in Google Classroom

Places, Terms & Characters to Know- Fever 1793 Study Guide- Side 2

On the back of your plot map from yesterday add the list below. For each item include a short description and the importance it plays in the novel.

Due:

Daily Digital Work- Fever 1793 in Google Classroom

Daily Digital Work- Fever 1793

Complete the daily work for each day- Slide & Chapter Reading

To do Chapter Readings- Choose from the options below:
1. In class reading of paper text
2. Full Book PDF- a personal copy for your Google Drive attached below
3. YouTube Full Book Playlist- Link attached below

Due:

IXL-  F. Analyzing literature 1-3 in Google Classroom

IXL- F. Analyzing literature 1-3

F. Analyzing literature
1 Analyze short stories
2 Vocabulary review: Analyze short stories
3 Label the rhyme scheme
After taking the notes below. Complete the practice on IXL. Smart Score of at least 90 is the goal. Screenshot your score and attach it to this assignment when you are done.

Due:

NoRedInk! Shifting Paragraphs from Passive to Active Voice in Google Classroom

NoRedInk! Shifting Paragraphs from Passive to Active Voice

Work on “Shifting Paragraphs from Passive to Active Voice.”

Due:

Daily English 5-4-3-2-1  Nov 16-27 in Google Classroom

Daily English 5-4-3-2-1 Nov 16-27

Complete the daily ELA Skills Practice. 1 per over the week.
5- Mon.
4- Tues.
3- Wed.
2- Thurs.
1- Fri.
Repeat for following week. Submit when completed

Due:

MM.1 Commas with series, dates, and places
 in Google Classroom

MM.1 Commas with series, dates, and places

After taking the notes below. Complete the practice on IXL. Smart Score of at least 90 is the goal. Screenshot your score and attach it to this assignment when you are done.

Add the notes below to your Digital ELA Notebook- Skills Notes (Make a new page if needed)

Commas 11/23
Use commas to separate three or more items in a SERIES. Put a comma after each item in the list, except for the last one. The last comma in the list (right before the coordinating conjunction) is called an Oxford comma or serial comma. The serial comma is sometimes considered optional, but most style guides demand it. (IXL requires it)
*Red, white, and blue are the colors of the American flag.
Expressions that consist of pairs of words, such as "thunder and lightning" and "bread and butter," are generally treated as single items.
*College costs typically include tuition, room and board, and textbooks.
In DATES with a day and a year, use a comma after the day. Also use a comma after the year unless the date ends the sentence.
*January 1, 2001, was the first day of this century.
*Mahatma Gandhi was born on October 2, 1869.
When the NAME OF A CITY is used with the name of its state or country, use a comma after the city. Also use a comma after the state or country unless it ends the sentence.
*Chicago, Illinois, is known as the Windy City.
*We've just booked our flight to Athens, Greece.

Due:

NoRedInk! Thanksgiving Choice Writing in Google Classroom

NoRedInk! Thanksgiving Choice Writing

Work on “Thanksgiving Choice Writing.”

Due:

IXL -G. 1 & 2	Analyzing informational texts in Google Classroom

IXL -G. 1 & 2 Analyzing informational texts

Complete to a 90 Smart Score. Screen shot and attach to this assignment.

IXL -G. Analyzing informational texts
1 Read and understand informational passages
2 Vocabulary review: Read and understand informational passages

Due:


 IXL S.1 Use the correct homophone in Google Classroom

IXL S.1 Use the correct homophone

Complete to a 90 Smart Score. Screen shot and attach to this assignment.

Due:

Daily English 5-4-3-2-1  Nov 9-13 in Google Classroom

Daily English 5-4-3-2-1 Nov 9-13

Complete the daily ELA Skills Practice. 1 per over the week.
5- Mon.
4- Tues.
3- Wed.
4- Thurs.
5- Fri. Submit when completed

Due:

IXL- E.6 Classify figures of speech
 in Google Classroom

IXL- E.6 Classify figures of speech

Complete to a 90 Smart Score. Screen shot and attach to this assignment.

Add the notes below to your Digital Notebook Skill Notes-
Figures of speech are words or phrases that use language in a nonliteral or unusual way. They can make writing more expressive.
Alliteration is the repetition of sounds at the beginning of nearby words.
What a lucky little lady you are!
An allusion is a brief reference to something or someone well known, often from history or literature.
"I'd better get home before I turn into a pumpkin!" Lila remarked.
An idiom is an expression that cannot be understood literally. Its meaning must be learned.
The assignment was a piece of cake.
A simile uses like or as to compare two things that are not actually alike.
The cat's fur was as dark as the night.
A metaphor compares two things that are not actually alike without using like or as.
The snow formed a blanket over the town.
Onomatopoeia involves using a word that expresses a sound.
The scrambled eggs hit the floor with a splat.
Personification is giving human characteristics to nonhuman things.
The trees danced in the wind.
A pun involves using a word or phrase in a humorous way that suggests more than one meaning.
A great new broom is sweeping the nation.
Verbal irony involves saying one thing but implying something very different. People often use verbal irony when they are being sarcastic.
Olivia seems thrilled that her car keeps breaking down.

Each breakdown is as enjoyable as a punch to the face.

Due:

‌Philadelphia:‌ ‌The‌ ‌Great‌ ‌Experiment‌ ‌-Documentary‌ ‌Notes-‌ 
 in Google Classroom

‌Philadelphia:‌ ‌The‌ ‌Great‌ ‌Experiment‌ ‌-Documentary‌ ‌Notes-‌

Incomplete sentences with specific details record 15 Facts about The Yellow Fever Epidemic that ravaged the city of Philadelphia from 179301802.

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IXL- E.2 Identify the narrative point of view
 in Google Classroom

IXL- E.2 Identify the narrative point of view

Complete the skill with a Smart Score of 90 for proficiency.

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Yellow Fever Scavenger Hunt in Google Classroom

Yellow Fever Scavenger Hunt

Follow the link below to answer #1-5 on the doc attached. Use complete sentences to respond to each question. (TTQA)

We will finish #6-11 after reading Fever 1793.

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Genre Focus- Realistic Fiction in Google Classroom

Genre Focus- Realistic Fiction

1.Read the attached article (with a peer?).
2. On your own complete #1-5 after reading in complete sentences.

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NoRedInk! Growth Quiz: Sentence- Parts of, Complete/Fragment. in Google Classroom

NoRedInk! Growth Quiz: Sentence- Parts of, Complete/Fragment.

Work on “Growth Quiz: Sentence- Parts of, Complete/Fragment.”

Due:

Fever 1793 Anticipation Guide in Google Classroom

Fever 1793 Anticipation Guide

Respond to the 5 statements attached. Use complete sentences to show your reasoning.

Define these 3 words. Add them to the top of your Anticipation Guide before responding to the 5 Statements.
Bravery-
Independence-
Self-Reliant-

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Spooky Story Recording in Google Classroom

Spooky Story Recording

Use Flipgrid to record yourself reading your Spooky Story Final Draft.

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The Real Story of Halloween-History Channel Documentary in Google Classroom

The Real Story of Halloween-History Channel Documentary

While viewing this documentry record 15 facts about the orgins about how the traditions of Halloween started.

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NoRedInk! Components of a Sentence Practice in Google Classroom

NoRedInk! Components of a Sentence Practice

Work on “Components of a Sentence Practice .”

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Reading Folklore- Halloween’s scary fairies in Google Classroom

Reading Folklore- Halloween’s scary fairies

Read and Respond

Written Response- Full Paragraph
#4 How did the tradition of Halloween begin? Use specific details from the text to explain what you learned in this article.

These questions may help you form a response:
- What was Samhain Eve?
- Why do we carve pumpkins?
- Why do people dress up for Halloween?
- Why is candy (or sweets) typically associated with Halloween?
- How did the tradition spread?

Due:

Folklore Reading- If it sucks like a vampire... in Google Classroom

Folklore Reading- If it sucks like a vampire...

Folklore refers to the fictional stories passed down through generations, often orally, in a particular culture. The folklore of a people often emphasizes the traditional beliefs and values of those people.

As you read the article, ask yourself: what is vampire folklore like in different cultures?

Read Article and Respond to questions 1-4

Complete #5 as a SHORT WRITTEN Response-
How does vampire folklore differ across cultures and history? Use at least THREE examples from the text to support your response.

Due:

Why is it fun to be frightened? Questions 1-4, 5 Use evidence from the text to support your thinking in a short paragraph response. in Google Classroom

Why is it fun to be frightened? Questions 1-4, 5 Use evidence from the text to support your thinking in a short paragraph response.

BEFORE READING THIS TEXT
"Scary" Memories: Before reading, share with a partner one of the times in you life when you've been the most scared. With your partners discuss your experiences and see if there any commonalities.

Analyzing Evidence: While reading, highlight phrases that you agree or disagree with.

Research can lead to conclusions that often represent the sample(Majority), but that there may be individual variations in data points(Outliers).

Due:

Reading Strategies & Questions-The Black Cat by Edgar Allan Poe in Google Classroom

Reading Strategies & Questions-The Black Cat by Edgar Allan Poe

Complete the attcahed Reading Strategies notes worksheet. The Black Cat by Edgar Allan Poe is a short story that is a study of the psychology of guilt and of our capacity for evil. This story is paired with a Poe favorites: The Raven & The Tell-Tale Heart.

You can choose how to read
1. Video w audio & text attached (use headphones/earbuds or read text w video)
2. Pfd of full text attached

Complete the attcahed Questions #1 -12 Using Complete sentences and evidence from the text to support your thinking.

Due:

The science of superstition — and why people believe in the unbelievable in Google Classroom

The science of superstition — and why people believe in the unbelievable

Sign in with GOOGLE
Read Short Article
Answer 4 attached questions

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TheRaven-GuidedQuestions in Google Classroom

TheRaven-GuidedQuestions

Read the attached Poem "The Raven" by Edgar Allen Poe

Complete the Guided Reading Questions by referring back to the Poem. Type YOUR responses in BLUE.

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NoRedInk! Short Story- I should have known better... in Google Classroom

NoRedInk! Short Story- I should have known better...

Work on “Short Story- I should have known better....”

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Sentences and Incomplete Sentences in Google Classroom

Sentences and Incomplete Sentences

Complete the attached practice both pages all tasks.

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NoRedInk! Quick Write - I’ve Got a Deal for You in Google Classroom

NoRedInk! Quick Write - I’ve Got a Deal for You

Work on “I’ve Got a Deal for You.”

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Said is Dead in Google Classroom

Said is Dead

1.Use the atached infographic and video to brain storm 20 different words to use in your spooky story now that said is dead. Add them to the Said Grave stone.
2.Copy and paste this slide into your Skills Notes Section of our Digital ELA Notebook.
3.Go through your spooky story and remember Said is Dead. Replace said with vaired tags to add interest to your Spooky Story.

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Spooky Story- Draft 1 after Outlining in Google Classroom

Spooky Story- Draft 1 after Outlining

Type your Spooky story here in paragraph format be sure to indent each new paragraph. Think about writing each section of the outline as it’s own paragraph. The rising action will have multiple paragraphs since it should show several problems building to add to the conflict.

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NoRedInk! Practice with Sentence Fragments/Clauses in Google Classroom

NoRedInk! Practice with Sentence Fragments/Clauses

Work on “Practice with Sentence Fragments/Clauses.”

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Spooky Short Story Outline in Google Classroom

Spooky Short Story Outline

Brainstorm and fill out the attached outline to start the writing process for our spooky stories that we will share for parent teacher conferences.

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NoRedInk!  “Parts of Speech Practice.” in Google Classroom

NoRedInk! “Parts of Speech Practice.”

Work on “Parts of Speech Practice.”

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E-Mail Etiquette Assessment in Google Classroom

E-Mail Etiquette Assessment

Complete the google form Quiz to show that you understand email etiquette based on the 20 tips.

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Email Scenarios w/ Rubric in Google Classroom

Email Scenarios w/ Rubric

Directions: Use the template email and the rubric on the first slide to compse an email following one of the scenarios attached on second slide. Complete the rubric before submitting. Create a textbook and use X's to show you have completed each item on the rubric.

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9/29 Good Example Analysis & Personal Response  in Google Classroom

9/29 Good Example Analysis & Personal Response

Complete the 2 attached email tasks be sure to refer to your Email 20 Tips and the part of an email diagram attached.

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9/24 Pre-Reading Seventh Grade by Gary Soto in Google Classroom

9/24 Pre-Reading Seventh Grade by Gary Soto

Complete the attached prereading activites

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9/16 Bellringer  in Google Classroom

9/16 Bellringer

In the Bellringer section of your Digital ELA Notebook-

9/16- What is your favorite book/ reading material?
Why do you like it?
(Paragraph response can include image to support)

Due:

Funny Email  in Google Classroom

Funny Email

Have them identify the errors to refresh their memories
about what you discussed on Day 1.

Fill out the evaluation page with stars and specific reasons for your rating.

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Email Task Cards in Google Classroom

Email Task Cards

Complete the attached task cards. Record emails on slide 1. Work with shoulder partner if in class.

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Email Etiquette in Google Classroom

Email Etiquette

1. Send an email to any teacher with a made up/real question or concern. Save as a draft (or send if a real concern)
2. Watch video linked below- How does this relate to you?
3. Go over Email Etiquette 101 Presentation- taking notes in your ELA Digital Notebook under skills practice tab
4. Complete the Email Etiquette Practice Pages attached-you can type your responses on in a different color ink. Turn in these pages when complete. Finish as HW if not done in class.

Due Friday 9/11

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ELA Digital Notebook in Google Classroom

ELA Digital Notebook

This is your notebook for the year.

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9/11 Bellringer  in Google Classroom

9/11 Bellringer

9/11- “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me. ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.” -Mr. Rodgers

What can you/everyday people do to be a helper in a bad situation? (Paragraph response)

Due:

Would you rather get a brand new car or get to take a three month trip around the world when you turn 18? in Google Classroom

Would you rather get a brand new car or get to take a three month trip around the world when you turn 18?

Respond with your choice in a complete sentence with an explanation of why.

Be sure to use capitals, end punctuation and reread your submission before turning in.
Only responses done completely will earn points.